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Kate’s Bio and Press Pix

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Short version:

Kate is the president of the Telework Research Network, a consulting an research organization dedicated to making the management case for workplace flexibility. She has reviewed more than 500 studies on telecommuting and related topics and interviewed dozens of virtual employers, employees, advocates, and venture capitalists who have invested in remote work models. Using the latest Census data, and assumptions from dozens of government and private sector sources, her organization has developed models to quantify the economic, environmental, and societal potential on telecommuting for every, city, county, Congressional District, and state in the US and for the UK and Canada. Hundreds of company and community leaders have used their models to make the case for telework.

Kate’s popular press book (co-authored with Tom Harnish), Undress For Success: The Naked Truth About Making Money at Home (Wiley, 2009), has won the praise of top work-life experts. Jack Nilles, the father of telecommuting contributed the foreword to the book. Her research on telework and other types of workplace flexibility have been cited in the Wall Street Journal, Harvard Business Review, Inc. magazine and dozens of other publications.

Her white papers include:

You can follow Kate on LinkedIn, Twitter, FacebookGoogleSlideshare, YouTube.

Long Version

Kate is the president of the Telework Research Network, a consulting an research organization dedicated to making the management case for workplace flexibility. She has reviewed more than 500 studies on telecommuting and related topics and interviewed dozens of virtual employers, employees, advocates, and venture capitalists who have invested in remote work models. Using the latest Census data, and assumptions from dozens of government and private sector sources, the models her organization has developed models to quantify the economic, environmental, and societal potential on telecommuting for every, city, county, Congressional District, and state in the U.S and for the UK and Canada. Hundreds of company and community leaders have used their models to make the case for telework.

As a writer, Kate and her partner, Tom Harnish have co-authored three business books. Undress For Success: The Naked Truth About Making Money at Home (John Wiley & Sons 2009), is aimed at empowering employees to request, find, or create workplace flexibility. It has won the praise of top telework and work-life advocates including principals with WorldatWork, the Canadian Telework Association, the Telework Coalition, and Jack Nilles – the father of telework who also wrote the foreword for the book. Their other books include Finding Money–The Small Business Guide to Financing (Wiley, 1995; revised as eBook in 2010), and The Directory of Venture Capital (Wiley, 1996).

As a speaker, Kate has delivered over a hundred lectures, webinars, and speeches for organizations including WorldatWork, Citrix Online, Verizon, Watermark, Wharton School of Business, and Temple University; and she developed small business training programs for Corestates Bank, Keystone Bank, Liberty Bank, Unisys, and Eastman Kodak.

Kate maintains several websites including: globalworkplaceanalytics.com, Undress4Success.com, and FindingMoneyAdvice.com. She has authored numerous articles for publications including the Wall Street Journal, The Journal of Commercial Banking, and many others. She is an Entrepreneur Magazine columnist, a regular contributor to American Express Open Forum, and a blogger for Workshifting.com (CitrixOnline).

As an entrepreneur, Kate has owned an operated several businesses including the nation’s oldest and largest vintage airplane flightseeing business. For her small business advocacy, she was recognized as an Inc. magazine / Arthur Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award Program finalist. The U.S. Small Business Administration named her Regional Business Advocate of the Year. Those awards were, in part, in recognition of a microloan program she developed to help disadvantaged businesses. Five major Philadelphia banks provided seed grants for the loan fund.

Prior to venturing out on her own, Kate spent 10 years as a commercial bank lender and private equity investor.

You can follow Kate on LinkedIn, Twitter, FacebookGoogleSlideshare, YouTube.