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How do you keep remote workers from feeling like second-class citizens?  
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How do you keep remote workers from feeling like second-class citizens?  

Many employers, however, “have let remote work happen rather than make it happen. They haven’t done the (management) training,” says Kate Lister, president of consultancy Global Workplace Analytics.

 

Source: www.wsj.com

It's all too easy to forget that person who dialed into the meeting remotely (and for them to forget about you). Good communication doesn't just happen, you have to make it happen. That's true for face-to-face or remote employees. Dell, National Equity Fund, and many others make it work in a big way and reap the benefits in attraction/retention, engagement, cost reductions, and more.

 


Emotional Intelligence—A key skill for the future, particularly for managers of remote teams 
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Emotional Intelligence—A key skill for the future, particularly for managers of remote teams 

"No amount of technological wizardry or personal autonomy negates the fact–which has long been true for office-bound workers as well–that job satisfaction is still closely tied to having an effective, emotionally intelligent boss."

 

Source: www.fastcompany.com

Importantly, the article cautions:

  • Don't forget your remote team members. One examples cites a financial services firm that insists if one person is attending a meeting remotely, everyone else must attend using the same tool.
  • Establish trust by taking the time to get to know your remote team; sharing information about who you/they are as a person strengthens relationships.
  • Talk less and listen more. Emotionally intelligent managers excel at asking effective questions to draw their people out.


Does your workplace strategy help people connect with others? If not, perhaps it should.
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Does your workplace strategy help people connect with others? If not, perhaps it should.

Self-reflection, introspection and some degree of solitude are important parts of a psychologically healthy life. But somewhere along the line we seem to have gotten the balance wrong. Because far from confirming our insistence that “happiness comes from within,” a wide body of research tells us almost the exact opposite."

Source: www.nytimes.com

Time use studies show the average person spends little more than 30 minutes a day communicating and socializing! We are eating alone more, attending fewer social events, and "hanging out" virtually rather than face to face.

 

Yet we know good social relationships are essential to both happiness and our health. And we know having friends at work is an important factor in employee engagement.

 

What are you doing to encourage human connectedness? 


If office noise is such a problem, why don’t noisy coffee shops, airports, or co-working spaces bother us?
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If office noise is such a problem, why don’t noisy coffee shops, airports, or co-working spaces bother us?

"The problem may be that, in our offices, we can’t stop ourselves from getting drawn into others’ conversations or from being interrupted while we’re trying to focus. Indeed, the EEG researchers found that face-to-face interactions, conversations, and other disruptions negatively affect the creative process."

Source: hbr.org

This HBR article suggests the problem with noisy offices is more a matter of who's making the noise than how loud it is. Recent brain science suggests just the right amount of noise (i.e. coffee shop level) may enhance creativity.


Workplace Evolutionaries (WE) win 5 awards at IFMA World Workplace; Kate North, Global Chair and co-founder of WE, honored with prestigious Chair Citation 
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Workplace Evolutionaries (WE) win 5 awards at IFMA World Workplace; Kate North, Global Chair and co-founder of WE, honored with prestigious Chair Citation 

Workplace transformation strategist, change leader and community-builder Kate North was honored for her contributions to IFMA and to the facility management profession with a Chair Citation presented by 2017-2018 chair of IFMA’s board of directors William M. O'Neill, CFM.

 

Other awards went to WE leaders: Christopher Hood, Stephen Monaco, Diane Coles-Levine, and Nancy Sanquist-Johnson.   

“As global chair of IFMA’s Workplace Evolutionaries (WE) Community, Kate North (Colliers) has led a group of forward-thinking workplace strategists to accelerate research, knowledge, and innovation around the emerging workplace,” said William O'Neill, CFM, Chair of IFMA’s Board of Directors. “Kate and the WE Community know the workplace is changing; but instead of watching it unfold, they’re making it happen.”

 

Distinguished Author Awards went to:

 

 

Christopher Hood (Advanced Workplace Associates), co-founder of WE Global Chair Award his WE leadership, his commitment to sharing knowledge as the co-host of the WE:binars, and for his work with academic institutions toward expanding their real estate and FM programs to include a holistic approach to workplace transformation. 

 

Hood also accepted the Community Award of Excellence in Communications award on behalf of WE.


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