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Will robots take your job? New report on future work in the US & UK says not as bad as predicted.1
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Will robots take your job? New report on future work in the US & UK says not as bad as predicted.1

"New study forecasts only one in five workers are in occupations that will shrink; lays out blueprint for reskilling workers

“The Future of Skills: Employment in 2030" The study takes an entirely new approach to forecasting employment and skill demands in the US and UK. 

Source: www.nesta.org.uk

Key findings: 

 

- Education, healthcare, and wider public sector occupations are likely to grow while some low-skilled jobs, in fields like construction and agriculture, are less likely to suffer poor labor market outcomes

- Future skills predicted to be in greater demand include:

  • Interpersonal skills, (teaching, social perceptiveness, and coordination, as well as related knowledge, such as psychology and anthropology)
  • Higher-order cognitive skills (originality, fluency of ideas, and active learning)
  • Systems skills (the ability to recognize, understand and act on interconnections and feedback loops in sociotechnical systems, systems analysis, and systems evaluation). 


Advice to employers: Begin training existing employees for future skills.


Coworking industry tracker cites concern over increased competition, overvaluation, and Regus’ plunge in value 
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Coworking industry tracker cites concern over increased competition, overvaluation, and Regus’ plunge in value 

The coworking industry is getting more competitive. Recent examples include stories about coworking spaces offering of a year's free rent to prospective tenants, reports of coworking spaces spying on competitors and coworking spaces closing down due to growing competition.

Source: www.smallbizlabs.com

Some are questioning the sustainability of co-working with Regus’ reporting a loss of 1/3rd their marketing value, a WSJ article likening WeWork's $20 Billion valuation to "pixie dust," and increased competition traditional office buildings,  libraries, and coffee shops.


Corporate Learning Needs to Step Up its Game and Measure Results
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Corporate Learning Needs to Step Up its Game and Measure Results

“...most corporate learning strategies have roots in traditional learning approaches. It is critical that new learning departs from these approaches and we increase self-direction for all employees, especially those who are new to the workforce.”

Source: www.raconteur.net

The pace of change demands continual learning. A course here or a course there won't cut it. As technologies for immediate/micro-learning, artificial/augmented intelligence, gamification, and personalization options mature, it will be increasingly important to measure what works rather than just rolling out the latest technology.


Insights from 3 books on the origins and neuroscience of creativity
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Insights from 3 books on the origins and neuroscience of creativity

"The creative impulse, writes Wilson, did not spring into life 10,000 years ago as some suggest, but dates back more than 100,000 years, to the birth of modern humans. A tripling of brain size over the 3 million years before that had endowed Homo sapiens with increased social intelligence and empathy, paving the way for symbolic language. "

Source: www.nature.com

This round-up of three books (all published this year) suggests creativity may be the result of a "restless brain bored by monotonous input." Novelty may light up our curiosity, but sparks may also come from exposure to complexity, uncertainty, and conflict. 


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