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“Workplace Evolutionaries” (WE, for short) just released an infographic to help its members navigate the wealth of research on the impact of the workplace on employee performance.
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“Workplace Evolutionaries” (WE, for short) just released an infographic to help its members navigate the wealth of research on the impact of the workplace on employee performance.

WE Research lies at the heart of what WE is all about…helping our “tribe” be the best they can be in their role as facility managers, workplace strategists, corporate real estate executives, and ot…

Source: we.ifma.org

This is a must-see infographic. It summarizes key research on the impact of place on human performance. The interactive bubbles drill down on what science knows about workplace design and its influence on thinking, stress, positivity, memory, and more!
 
Workplace Evolutionaries (WE), a community of practice within the International Facilities Management Association (IFMA), is dedicated to helping fellow workplace practitioners be the best they can be. 


Who are happiest employees…and why
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Who are happiest employees…and why

"a guest blog on the happiest workers and why they are so happy, but also touches upon the problem and pressure of compulsory happiness."

Source: corporate-rebels.com

Spoiler alert: florists, hairdressers, and plumbers. Why? Autonomy and frequent feedback/successes.


IBM’s recall of remote workers sounds like a death rattle. Say “goodbye” to the best and brightest.
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IBM’s recall of remote workers sounds like a death rattle. Say “goodbye” to the best and brightest.

“Everyone I know is very upset,” says one employee, who like most interviewed asked to remain anonymous while discussing an employer. Some workers furiously began looking for new jobs. Others say they have stopped contributing to long-term projects because they aren’t sure whether they’ll be around in the future. "

Source: qz.com

They can say "goodbye" to the best and brightest talent. Iike Yahoo and Best Buy, IBM is in deep trouble. Somehow that seems to create a "circle the wagons" reaction.

 

But the connection between co-location and collaboration or innovation has NOT been proven. Many of the studies often cited in these arguments date back to the early 1990s when working at a distance was much more difficult. 

 

What has been proven is that: 1) open offices are distracting and counterproductive. They are a particular nightmare for introverts who make up over 40% of employees; and 2) workplace flexibility is key to attracting and retaining talent.


Subtle signs of employee engagement are everywhere, even the office fridge and bathroom stall.
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Subtle signs of employee engagement are everywhere, even the office fridge and bathroom stall.

One morning last week, I opened the office refrigerator and saw that a gallon of milk had spilled inside. It was 8:30am, and I was facing my first moral test of the day: Would I clean it up, or shut the door and slowly back away? At my old job, I’m sad to say

Source: qz.com

Engagement surveys are important, but a careful look around the office can offer a quick read. When people show respect for their space and their co-workers, it shows. 


Now here’s an interesting headline: “Fight Trump. Work from home”
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Now here’s an interesting headline: “Fight Trump. Work from home”

About 135 million Americans commute to work, and according to a 2016 survey by research firm Global Workplace Analytics (GWA), 50 percent of them have jobs they could do remotely at least part time. If all those workers skipped the commute just every other day, we could reduce greenhouse gas emissions as much as we would by taking 9 million cars off the road.

Source: www.motherjones.com

The article points to employer and employee benefits of remote work including reduced work-life conflict, lower greenhouse gas emissions, a reduction on the outbound migration of talent, and even...increased voter turnout!


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