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Tag: overworking


Oxford Economics study explains why leaders aren’t addressing office noise
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Oxford Economics study explains why leaders aren’t addressing office noise

How smart companies are rewriting the rules of the open workplace

Source: www.oxfordeconomics.com

This study of 600 executives and 600 employees shows a big disconnect between how each group sees the problem of office noise. While only 35% of executives say noise reduces their employees' satisfaction and productivity, over half (50%) of employees say it does. The report suggests the problem may lie in the fact that executives don't feel the pain. Sixty-two percent still have private offices, compared to only 14% of employees. 

 

The study also uncovers the need for better remote work tools, technology integration, and a clearer understanding of work-life boundaries.


Another Japanese worker suffers death by overwork
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Another Japanese worker suffers death by overwork

Journalist Miwa Sado was killed, at the age of 31, by “karoshi” — the Japanese word for death due to overwork.

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

That society even has a word for 'death by overwork' is sad. And it's not just Japan that has the problem. Many of us still talk about how hard we work as though it was a badge of honor. 


Could halving your hours increase your productivity? This research says ‘yes’ 
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Could halving your hours increase your productivity? This research says ‘yes’ 

Are you working your brain too hard? Take it easy – like Charles Darwin, Alice Munro or Thomas Jefferson

Source: www.theguardian.com

I suspect part of why it works is that it causes you to focus on what needs to be done. I find this happens when I'm traveling. It feels like I do in a hour what would normally take me all day . I know I only have a limited time, so I don't let myself get distracted.


After-hours emails are now illegal in France.
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After-hours emails are now illegal in France.

"The right to disconnect" has been codified in law.

Source: www.huffingtonpost.com

I am all for solutions to the problem of being constantly on, but this isn't the way to go. I, for one, detest the inflexibility of the 9-5 routine. Yes, people should be able to turn off email when they're not working, but if I want to work odd hours, I should be allowed to.


An interesting take from the Economist on why we work so hard and a question about should we?
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An interesting take from the Economist on why we work so hard and a question about should we?

Our jobs have become prisons from which we don’t want to escape

Source: www.1843magazine.com

The last two paragraphs are the real meat of the story:

 

"I get hung up on as easily. The writing I could do as easily, just about. Building my career, away from our London headquarters, would not be so easy. As I explain this, a circularity threatens to overtake my point: to build my career is to make myself indispensable, demonstrating indispensability means burying myself in the work, and the upshot of successfully demonstrating my indispensability is the need to continue working tirelessly. Not only can I not do all that elsewhere; outside London, the obvious brilliance of a commitment to this course of action is underappreciated. It looks pointless – daft, even.

 

And I begin to understand the nature of the trouble I’m having communicating to my parents precisely why what I’m doing appeals to me. They are asking about a job. I am thinking about identity, community, purpose – the things that provide meaning and motivation. I am talking about my life."