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Tag: privacy


Private pop-up work tents being marketed as an escape from the open plan office 
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Private pop-up work tents being marketed as an escape from the open plan office 

Pause Pod wants to offer you a one-person escape pod from the tyrannies of the open office plan. This is what a work tent looks like.

 

In an open office plan, you are surrounded by co-workers, buffeted by the winds of their noisy company, whether you like to hear it or not. A new device wants to offer you a one-person escape pod from the tyrannies of this setup.

Pause Pod, which markets itself as the “world’s first private pop up space suitable for all your relaxation needs,” was launched as a Kickstarter campaign in April, and now can be bought in its prototype stage. The Sweden-based entrepreneurs said they were “inspired by the blanket forts we used to build when growing up.”

Source: www.theladders.com

You really have problems at your office if Pause Pods become a line item in your budget. 


Nearly 3 in 10 employees say their workplace fails to enable productivity. Lack of privacy and too much noise among top complaints. 
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Nearly 3 in 10 employees say their workplace fails to enable productivity. Lack of privacy and too much noise among top complaints. 

A survey involving over 275k global employees showed only 28% would agree with the statement "my workplace allows me to work productively." Another 15% were neutral.

Source: www.leesmanindex.com

Over 90% say individual focused or desk-based work are important to their job, yet these are spaces are what they are most lacking. 

 

More worrying is that a third of post-renovation/relocation projects deliver below average productivity. The report point to the need for more attention to post-move behavior modification.


A choice of workspaces (including more private space) yields greater productivity, reduced absenteeism, and more
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A choice of workspaces (including more private space) yields greater productivity, reduced absenteeism, and more

New designs are partly a backlash to wide-open floor plans and include a “palette of places,” meaning that people don’t sit in just one spot.

Source: www.nytimes.com

The right design and mix of spaces, including places for privacy, have been found to increase unplanned interaction, reduce time spent in formal meetings, and encourage employees to come into the office (rather than working remotely).

 

The article also cites research that points to a 25% increase in productivity when employees are given a choice of spaces, a 6% reduction in absenteeism where outdoor views are offered, and a significant increase in one's ability to perform challenging tasks due to improved ventilation.