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Tag: stress


An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  
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An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  

"Kate Lister breaks down the impact of the workplace on well-being and the steps to take to create a culture of well-being."

Source: workdesign.com

This article offers:

  • The financial impact of of poor health and well-being on productivity lost, reduced engagement, and turnover 
  • The cost of healthcare, absenteeism, and presenteeism for the top chronic diseases
  • A persuasive way to use a simple breakeven analysis to get your program funded
  • Simple steps to kick-start a workplace well-being initiative.


Stress does NOT decrease longevity…unless you believe it does
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Stress does NOT decrease longevity…unless you believe it does

Eight year study of 28k people "found that having a lot of stress in your life was not linked with premature death. But having a lot of stress in your life and believing it was taking a toll on your health increased risk of dying by 43 percent.

Source: www.nytimes.com

The lesson here is we need to learn how to change how we think about stress and even use it to our advantage.

 

The next time you're feeling stressed, think about how: 

  • That pounding heartbeat gathering energy to ready your body for the challenge
  • Your heavy breathing is simply oxygenating your brain to help you think more clearly
  • Your increased blood pressure is fueling your muscles and strengthening your body


Workplace civility spiraling down and with it goes productivity, trust, and loyalty. Here’s what to do about it.
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Workplace civility spiraling down and with it goes productivity, trust, and loyalty. Here’s what to do about it.

Research shows that hurtful workplace behavior can depress performance, increase employee turnover, and even mar customer relationships.

Source: www.mckinsey.com

A full 62% of employees say they've been treated rudely at work (up 27% since 1998). Three quarters of victims say the incident reduced their commitment to the organization. A quarter admit to taking their frustration out on customers. 


An interesting take from the Economist on why we work so hard and a question about should we?
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An interesting take from the Economist on why we work so hard and a question about should we?

Our jobs have become prisons from which we don’t want to escape

Source: www.1843magazine.com

The last two paragraphs are the real meat of the story:

 

"I get hung up on as easily. The writing I could do as easily, just about. Building my career, away from our London headquarters, would not be so easy. As I explain this, a circularity threatens to overtake my point: to build my career is to make myself indispensable, demonstrating indispensability means burying myself in the work, and the upshot of successfully demonstrating my indispensability is the need to continue working tirelessly. Not only can I not do all that elsewhere; outside London, the obvious brilliance of a commitment to this course of action is underappreciated. It looks pointless – daft, even.

 

And I begin to understand the nature of the trouble I’m having communicating to my parents precisely why what I’m doing appeals to me. They are asking about a job. I am thinking about identity, community, purpose – the things that provide meaning and motivation. I am talking about my life."