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Tag: well building


GSA’s free “Buildings and Health” tool offers a wealth of research
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GSA’s free “Buildings and Health” tool offers a wealth of research

GSA's Sustainable Facilities Tool was designed to help federal agencies and the general public build and buy green.

Source: sftool.gov

GSA's SFTool (Sustainability Facilities) just got better with the addition of four new tools:

  • The Buildings and Health Module highlights the financial benefits and shares best practices in making buildings healthier for their occupants 
  • A synopsis of how biophilia impacts health outcomes
  • A primer on Circadian Light
  • An interactive Health and Wellness Guidance Crosswalk which provides an easy-to-use way to compare sustainability and wellness rating systems across a broad range of criteria

The site also offer a wealth of research citations and additional resources all for free (well, sort of, if you don't count your tax dollars.)


An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  
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An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  

"Kate Lister breaks down the impact of the workplace on well-being and the steps to take to create a culture of well-being."

Source: workdesign.com

This article offers:

  • The financial impact of of poor health and well-being on productivity lost, reduced engagement, and turnover 
  • The cost of healthcare, absenteeism, and presenteeism for the top chronic diseases
  • A persuasive way to use a simple breakeven analysis to get your program funded
  • Simple steps to kick-start a workplace well-being initiative.


New study show employees perform significantly better in healthy buildings
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New study show employees perform significantly better in healthy buildings

According to a recent study, “The Impact of Green Buildings On Cognitive Function”, certified green buildings improve human health and cognitive abilities compared with similar buildings that are not certified.

Source: sourceable.net

Though the study size was small (only 109 subjects), it's good to see some rigor around measuring the results of healthy buildings.