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Agile Work News

  • Health impacts depend on what kind of workaholic you are 

    It’s about how you approach work, not how long you spend there.

    Source: hbr.org

    Work-a-holics possess over work and even if they don’t work long hours, they are still more likely to develop cardiovascular disease or diabetes than non-work-a-holics. By contrast, the research cited in this HBR article suggests that while those who work long hours not because they are possessed, but because they love what they do, are generally not at greater risk for serious health problems. The difference appears to be the ability to let it go and refresh. It the chronic rumination that is most toxic.

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  • WE/IFMA introduces first Workplace Management program—July 10 Launch

    Workplace Management is a dynamic, emerging discipline that designs and delivers an organization’s unique workplace experience, aligning it to strategic drivers and business goals.  It coordinates all the disciplines and infrastructure needed to deliver an integrated ‘experience’ in a powerful, economic and effective way, every day.

    Source: we.ifma.org

    The Workplace Management Program (WMP) is comprised of four modules, each of which includes three live Webinars  and one on-site Workshop.  The completion of all Modules and final Workshop will lead to a certificate of completion in Workplace Management. This is the first certificate of completion program in our industry! Space is limited. Sign up now: https://we.ifma.org/wmp-module-1/

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  • Join an upcoming WE:binar or watch one you missed

    "On the third Thursday of each month, Megan Campbell and Emily Dunn hosts a stimulating webinar on a leading workplace topics. Members receive an invitation in advance and a link to recordings following the webinar."

    Source: we.ifma.org

    June WE:binar: Moving the Needle on Workplace Outcomes Using Evidence-Based Practice

    Speaker: Dr. Shreya Sarkar-Barney, founder and CEO of Human Capital Growth (HCG), an evidence-based talent management firm

     

    Despite escalating investments in workplace programs, human capital challenges have become perennial. For the last decade, talent scarcity has remained among the top five CEO concerns and employee engagement scores have barely improved. By leveraging an evidence-based approach and leaning on 150 years of science, workplace strategists have the opportunity to drive measurable outcomes for people and business. This webinar will reveal an innovative approach that allows workplace strategists to make informed decisions and move the needle on what matters.

     

    Date: Thursday, June 20, 2019
    Time: 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM EDT

    Click Here to RSVP

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  • June WE:binar – Moving the Needle on Workplace Outcomes Using Evidence-Based Practice

    06/20/2019 @ 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM – Despite escalating investments in workplace programs, human capital challenges have become perennial. For the last decade, talent scarcity has remained among the top five CEO concerns and employee engagement scores have barely improved. By leveraging an evidence-based approach and leaning on 150 years of science, workplace strategists have the opportunity to drive measurable outcomes for people and business."

    Source: we.ifma.org

    This webinar will reveal an innovative approach that allows workplace strategists to make informed decisions and move the needle on what matters.

    The speaker is Dr. Shreya Sarkar-Barney, founder and CEO of Human Capital Growth (HCG), an evidence-based talent management firm. Combining science and analytics, HCG helps organizations such as Microsoft, Merck, General Mills, and Ecolab achieve better leader and talent outcomes. 

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  • Join Workplace Evolutionaries for a full track of great content at World Workplace this October

    10/16/2019 – 10/18/2019 @ – Registration is open for World Workplace Phoenix!

    Source: we.ifma.org

    Check out the entire track of speakers and content and register here.

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  • WE Hub New York City Presents: A Fireside Chat with Frank Cuevas from IBM

    Source: we.ifma.org

    The NY WE Hub has an exciting event planned for 06/18/2019. This interactive session will explore how IBM is using Corporate Real Estate strategies, solutions and tools to drive employee engagement and increase productivity. Frank Cuevas from IBM will lead the discussion and tour the their agile offices at Astor Place.

    Date: 06/18/2019 @ 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM – Reservations Required

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  • What can CRE learn from cruise ships or Mickey Mouse?

    Carnival and Disney are leveraging technology to delight their customers.

    Source: www.zdnet.com

    A simple wristband makes it possible for the Magic Kingdom to grant you access to rides, pay for food and other goodies, unlock your hotel room, enjoy a personal hello from Goofy or a birthday song from Mickey, and deliver pictures you didn’t even know you posed for (HBR).

    The (optional) medallion Carnival gives you is your key to not just your rooms, but get drinks and food delivered to wherever you happen to be, the ability to find and track your onboard friends, and of course, easily lose some money in the casino. It helps the cruise line account for people in an emergency, track their workers, schedule maid service when you leave your room, and much more.

    Privacy issues abound, but what can we in workplace design learn from these and other consumer pioneers?

     

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  • HBR advice on breaking down silos and cross-functional teams

    "The value of horizontal teamwork is widely recognized. Employees who can reach outside their silos to find colleagues with complementary expertise learn more, sell more, and gain skills faster."

    Source: hbr.org

    The article points to a variety of research on the importance of cross-functional teams and acknowledges how difficult creating those connections can be. It suggests 4 strategies for success:

    1) Develop and use cultural brokers, people inside the organization who have experience in multiple sectors and functions and can bridge the gap and solidify connections

    2) Teach people to ask (the right) questions and challenge conceived notions about one another

    3) Get people to see the world through one another’s eyes

    4) Broaden your employees’ vision by creating opportunities for them to widen their horizons both internally and externally 

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  • HBR/BCG Study reveals employees are more ready for ‘future of work’ than employers

    Employees are eager to embrace retraining—and companies need to seize this as a competitive opportunity.

    Source: hbr.org

    It would be impossible to do justice to this article in a few paragraphs but here are the key takeaways:

    – Six categories of disruption of the future of work:

      – Accelerating Technological Change

      – Growing Demand for Skills

      – Changing Employee Expectations

      – Shifting Labor Demographics

      – Transitioning Work Models

      – Evolving Business Environment

     – Employees are better than leaders at focusing on what these disruptors will mean to them

    – Employees are eager for re-skilling. They feel it’s their responsibility, not their employers or the governments. Still they’re worried about how.

    – Employers think otherwise. They think employees are resistant. 

    – Employees are worried about freelancers and contractors taking their jobs

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  • Big hole in latest research showing wellness programs don’t work

    "Employees exposed to a workplace wellness program reported significantly greater rates of some positive health behaviors compared with those who were not exposed, but there were no significant effects on clinical measures of health, health care spending and utilization, or employment outcomes after 18 months."

    Source: jamanetwork.com

    By all reports the research behind the latest report that workplace wellness programs don’t work is to be admired. But while I agree the research was conducted properly, it, like so many similar studies fails to account for the impact of wellness on productivity. Healthcare costs are minuscule compared to the productivity lost to presenteeism (being at work, but not performing your best) and absenteeism. Until we start measuring that, we won’t know whether our interventions are worth the bother.  

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