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Author Archives: Kate



Kate

WeWork’s purchase of people tracking software raises privacy issues
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WeWork’s purchase of people tracking software raises privacy issues

WeWork’s chief product officer said they’re aiming for a “Google analytics for space,” but their new tech acquisition raises questions about privacy i

Source: therealdeal.com

The WeWork model offers a rich source of data about what people like and dislike about a space. It also affords them insights about how and when people use various types of spaces. With the purchase of Euclid, they will now have the ability to track even more about how people utilize and move between spaces.

 

While the media response points to privacy issues, Euclid's technology is one of many that allows for people tracking. Smart phones, smart watches, sound and heat-sensing lightbulbs, programs that can 'watch' what employees are doing, and  many more technologies are becoming commonplace.

 

Working along side HR, IT, and Risk Management, organizations, particularly those in the U.S. who are not governed by GDPR, would be wise to take a deliberate stand on privacy now, before it is too late.

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13 Feb 2019
GitLab’s 2,000 page employee handbook available for free and it’s an amazing read!
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GitLab’s 2,000 page employee handbook available for free and it’s an amazing read!

"The GitLab team handbook is the central repository for how we run the company. Printed, it consists of over 2,000 pages of text. As part of our value of being transparent the handbook is open to the world, and we welcome feedback.

Source: about.gitlab.com

Why would you want to read a 2,000 page employee handbook? Because it's amazing. It covers everything from their core values to chat/email etiquette. There's a whole chapter devoted to communications protocols including how to keep virtual workers from feeling ostracized. Another chapter not only reveals the dozens of apps they use to manage their work, but details about how to use them. 

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08 Feb 2019
Is your job killing you? The answer is ‘yes’ for many of us.
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Is your job killing you? The answer is ‘yes’ for many of us.

Too many Americans are trapped in toxic jobs, a problem employers and employees need to take more seriously. Jeffrey Pfeffer, an organizational behavior professor at Stanford who wrote the book Dying for a Paycheck, found through his research that poor management in U.S. companies accounted for up to 8 percent of annual health costs and was associated with 120,000 excess deaths every year."

Source: www.huffpost.com

Work is the leading cause of stress and stress is a leading cause of many chronic problems including poor sleep, digestion, issues, depression, over-eating, pain, and more. While the article offers a couple of token ideas for reducing stress, the author's best advice to those with toxic jobs is to get a new one. Given the cost of losing a good employee and the war for talent, reducing employee stress and ferreting out the root causes ought to be an employer's job #1.

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24 Jan 2019
Microsoft includes remote worker stigma in unconscious bias training
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Microsoft includes remote worker stigma in unconscious bias training

By using videoconferencing and chat tools like Skype and instant messaging, Rich Kaplan, general manager of employee experience at Microsoft, says he's seen teams "move beyond" the face-time bias. Sometimes, he says, a team will host multiple meetings on the same topic, to make sure everyone from different time zones has a chance to chime in.
 
"I think the technology is good enough today where if you really want to be diverse and inclusive globally, you have no choice but to use the tools to your advantage," he says.

Source: www.cnn.com

A UC Davis researcher quoted in the article suggests there's an unconscious perception that people who are seen around the office during regular working hours are more reliable, committed, dependable than remote workers (including telecommuters and those who travel heavily). In fact, Microsoft's 'unconscious bias' training includes an example of forgetting to invite remote workers to a meeting. 

The worry is that the 'not-being-seen'-bias could result in poorer performance reviews. It suggests including social time with remote workers and making sure managers judge their people by what they do, rather than their subjective feelings toward them.

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24 Jan 2019
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