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HBR/BCG Study reveals employees are more ready for ‘future of work’ than employers
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HBR/BCG Study reveals employees are more ready for ‘future of work’ than employers

Employees are eager to embrace retraining—and companies need to seize this as a competitive opportunity.

Source: hbr.org

It would be impossible to do justice to this article in a few paragraphs but here are the key takeaways:

- Six categories of disruption of the future of work:

  - Accelerating Technological Change

  - Growing Demand for Skills

  - Changing Employee Expectations

  - Shifting Labor Demographics

  - Transitioning Work Models

  - Evolving Business Environment

 - Employees are better than leaders at focusing on what these disruptors will mean to them

- Employees are eager for re-skilling. They feel it's their responsibility, not their employers or the governments. Still they're worried about how.

- Employers think otherwise. They think employees are resistant. 

- Employees are worried about freelancers and contractors taking their jobs


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Big hole in latest research showing wellness programs don’t work

"Employees exposed to a workplace wellness program reported significantly greater rates of some positive health behaviors compared with those who were not exposed, but there were no significant effects on clinical measures of health, health care spending and utilization, or employment outcomes after 18 months."

Source: jamanetwork.com

By all reports the research behind the latest report that workplace wellness programs don't work is to be admired. But while I agree the research was conducted properly, it, like so many similar studies fails to account for the impact of wellness on productivity. Healthcare costs are minuscule compared to the productivity lost to presenteeism (being at work, but not performing your best) and absenteeism. Until we start measuring that, we won't know whether our interventions are worth the bother.  


Excellent roundup on the impact of noise on human performance
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Excellent roundup on the impact of noise on human performance

We have never been subject to more workplace noise and distraction than we are now, but the challenges are more complex than they first appear

Source: workplaceinsight.net

Workplace Insight just produced an excellent round-up of research on the impact of noise on human performance. If you follow the topic, there won't be any big surprises, but it's great to have the data all in one place. Here's some of the research cited in the report:

- The noise problem is getting worse

- 60% of work is individual, not collaborative

- A third of employees say the have to leave the building to focus

- 63% of employees say they don't have access to quiet space

- 40% of executives understand the negative impact of noise on productivity, but only 6% mitigate it

- 75% of the noise problem is subjective

- Only 25% of the noise problem relates to its volume

- Even low levels of noice can reduce cognitive performance by 30%

- Some noise is good for creativity

 


97% of EU Building Stock is 30+ years old—Here’s what’s needed to meet climate goals
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97% of EU Building Stock is 30+ years old—Here’s what’s needed to meet climate goals

EU has strong environmental ambitions and building stock must be at the center of any efforts to reduce power consumption and decarbonize EU economies.

Source: memoori.com

The Building Performance Institute Europe (BPIE) estimates that 97% of the EU’s buildings will need to be upgraded to achieve the 2050 decarbonization goals. Approximately two-thirds of European building stock was built before 1980. Only about 1% are renovated each year. 

BPIE recommends organizations start their journey by maximizing energy efficiencies where possible then looking to renewable energy, developing energy storage capacity, incorporating demand response, and decarbonizing heating and cooling. 


Deloitte study shows businesses taking sustainability more seriously
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Deloitte study shows businesses taking sustainability more seriously

Most businesses and residential consumers surveyed realize the need to address climate change. But while businesses are upping the ante in managing resources, some residential consumers are still held back by cost and complexity.

Source: www2.deloitte.com

The most notable indication of growing interest in environmental sustainability was a 70% increase in businesses reporting they were allocating the highest degree of effort to their resource management programs (67% in 2018 vs 39% in 2016). Cost reduction is still the primary driver (cited by 50% of respondents), but "doing the right thing" percolated up 11 percentage points in the latest study.

Other significant drivers included tax incentives, employee pressure, the likelihood of future regulatory requirements, competitive advantage, social responsibility, and current regulatory requirements. Small and mid-cap organizations report less difficulty in reducing usage than large ones.


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