MENU

scoops


Remote collaboration on steroids: Brain to brain problem solving across distances

Remote collaboration on steroids: Brain to brain problem solving across distances

BrainNet allows collaborative problem-solving using direct brain-to-brain communication.

Source: www.technologyreview.com

While it's no longer sci-fi, there probably won't be any brain-to-brain collaboration tool vendors at IFMA or CoreNet events for some years yet. Still, the fact that this research team has already demonstrated that it can be done is pretty fascinating. 

Here's the short story: Three people, in different locations, are collaborating to solve a Tetris-like game. Two can see the whole screen, one can only see part of it (not the critical part). Using EEGs to record brain signals and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to non-invasively deliver information to the two with full screen views lead the third player to the solution. 


Study shows workers spend less time outside than prisoners

Study shows workers spend less time outside than prisoners

"Ambius revealed that that office workers spend just 47 minutes outside during a typical working day, which is less than prisoners, who require at least one hour of outdoor exposure each day, according to UN guidelines."

Source: www.bdcnetwork.com

This thousand-person study of US and UK workers also reported that over a third spend less than 15 minutes outside each day. Not surprisingly, 64% say natural lighting is very important to them. [Disclosure: the study was conducted by a company that specializes in interior landscapes.]


There’s nothing standard about global space standards

There’s nothing standard about global space standards

Many of today’s companies are putting in place global guidelines that strive to create consistent work and cultural experiences.

Source: workdesign.com

Kay Sargent from HOK offers an excellent round-up of the challenges and opportunities for workplace design across different parts of the world. She stresses the importance of guidelines vs. standards to accommodate differences in culture, organizational structure, demographics, market conditions, legal issues, and technological factors. 


New report sheds light on UK worker attitudes toward AI, flexibility, delayed retirement, and social conscience

New report sheds light on UK worker attitudes toward AI, flexibility, delayed retirement, and social conscience

In partnership with strategic foresight thinktank, The Future Laboratory, we setout to identify and unpack some of the biggest trends driving changes in the workforce, with the aim of helping businesses prepare for the new employment landscape they will shape.

Source: www.unum.co.uk

This report based on 3,000 U.K. workers found that:

  • 48% of workers feel AI will help with mundane tasks
  • 55% feel it will lead to redundancies
  • 36% would like more technology that monitors their work to identify ways they can increase productivity
  • 43% would be interested in tech that optimizes brain chemistry
  • 77% say flexibility at work is very important to them
  • 65% plan to work longer than planned because they want to
  • 56% plan to do so because they have to
  • 74% of older workers want to continually learn
  • 61% felt companies should make a positive contribution to society
  • 50% would be turned off by a company that didn't do so


MIT’s Working on Self-Adjusting Workspaces 

MIT’s Working on Self-Adjusting Workspaces 

Smart office uses biosensors and machine learning to optimize individual work environments

Source: www.media.mit.edu

Imagine a workspace that adjusts the lighting, sound, and projected images for the kind of work you're doing. MIT, Steelcase, and Phillips are working together to do just that. Using sensors to measure heart rate variability, facial features, and eye focus, this trio is hoping to do. The hope for "mediated atmospheres," as they call them, is to improve human performance, reduce stress, and enhance wellness and well-being. The science behind all this is available here: https://goo.gl/XxnWG9


(99) Something For Introverts

(99) Something For Introverts

Many introverts are not the quiet little mice you might think. They've learned to 'fake it' just to fit in.

Source: www.facebook.com

When I posted this video to LinkedIn a few weeks ago, I was shocked at the responses from, mostly introverts, who finally felt understood. One commented "introverts are people too."

 

We (yes, I am one, but even friends don't know it) represent about half of the workforce. And while we can be the life of the party, we get our strength from being alone while extroverts get theirs from being with people. So stop trying to drag us out of our shells. We actually like it in here.


Open Offices: The dumbest fad ever or the answer to your innovation prayers?

Open Offices: The dumbest fad ever or the answer to your innovation prayers?

"For some people, “open office” means tearing down the walls, installing benches, and giving workers the option to sit wherever they want—as long as it’s somewhere in the big open space. For others it represents one choice in an ecosystem of workspaces that allow people to work wherever they want."

Source: fmlink.com

The debate about "open offices" is more about semantics than workplaces. Before we start the bashing or praising, we need to get on the same page about what it means. 

 

This article suggest we focus instead on creating places that cover these "seven critical c's: concentration, contemplation, collaboration, creativity, conversation, community, and caffeine.


Chris North, Gabor Nagy, and Kate Lister hope you’ll join them at World Workplace 2018 for their “Highlights from Global Workplace Benchmarking Study” session

Chris North, Gabor Nagy, and Kate Lister hope you’ll join them at World Workplace 2018 for their “Highlights from Global Workplace Benchmarking Study” session

Workplace Evolutionairies, a community of practice within IFMA will once again offer a full three days of great content at IFMA's WWP in Charlotte NC, October 3rd through October 5th.

Source: we.ifma.org

This session is not to be missed. It will offer insights into workplace trends across the past decade from “The Once Alternative Workplace Strategy Fifth Annual Benchmarking Report (2018).” Based on 10 years of trend data, covered topics will include: workplace strategies, workplace design, work practices, change management practices, where work is conducted, executive sponsorship, and more. The report was developed by a trio of Workplace Evolutionaries (WE), Chris Hood (Advanced Workplace Associates), Kate Lister (Global Workplace Analytics), and Gaby Nagy, Ph.D. (Haworth, Inc.) and additionally supported by WE/IFMA. Check out this month’s FM Journal for more information. It will be held in the WE room (room 208) from 3pm to 3:30 on October 4th. #wwpchar18 #ifma #weworkplace


World Workplace 2018 – WE’s Week @ a Glance

World Workplace 2018 – WE’s Week @ a Glance

IFMA World Workplace 2018 is right around the corner and the Workplace Evolutionaries Community (WE) has a line-up you won't want to miss. Be sure to come early. The fun and learning begins on Wednesday, October 4 at 8 a.m. (Charlotte NC).

Source: we.ifma.org

Wednesday 10/4 kicks off at 8am and includes:

- A year of insights from the the industry's top workplace innovators (led by renowned podcaster, Mike Petrusky from iOffice)

- Workshop: The Discovery that Forever Changed the Future and How we Work (led by best-selling author Bill Jensen)

- Explore the fascinating Erste Campus case study with workplace strategist Martin Ruppe

- Shift Happens: IT, REAL, ESUS and WE come together for a cross-functional look at the Top 3 "Big Shifts” 

 

Thursday 10/5 look forward to:

- WE HUB Workshop: Share experiences with HUB leaders from around the world and learn how to start a HUB in your area

- Seven great sessions on topics that include: Evolving Technologies and New Innovations, How FM Can Drive Culture and Engagement, Findings from the 5th Biennial Global Workplace Benchmarking Survey, Demystifying the Workplace Experience, Revelations and Calculations about Circulation, and Making the Change Process Predictable

-WE Tour, WE Learn, and WE socialize with IA

 

Friday offers a lineup worth staying for:

Six great sessions on: Redefining Experience, The Need for Focus, Quantifying the Impact of Workplace Change, Quantifying a Great Experience, The Future of Work Through the Lens of HR, IT, and CRE/FM, A New Landscape of Work, Cracking the Code on Unassigned Seating, and Hacking the Workplace.

 

Come Early and Stay Late so you don't miss out!


Journaled study measured a 70% reduction in face-to-face interaction after the introduction of an open office

Journaled study measured a 70% reduction in face-to-face interaction after the introduction of an open office

Organizations’ pursuit of increased workplace collaboration has led managers to transform traditional office spaces into ‘open’, transparency-enhancing architectures with fewer walls, doors and other spatial boundaries, yet there is scant direct empirical research on how human interaction patterns change as a result of these architectural changes."

Source: rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org

In two separate field-based studies, the researchers documented a 70% reduction in face-to-face interaction after the introduction of an open office environment. Email communications increased by 25% to 50% during the same period. Co-located teams suffered the same decline as those that were not.  

 

Pulling from other research, the article stresses:

- the relative richness of face-to-face over email and texting

- the importance of intermittent, rather than constant social interaction on collaborative work and problem solving

 

It concludes that open offices have the perverse effect of reducing, rather than increasing productive communication.

 

This claims to be the first study to empirically measure both face-to-face and electronic interaction before and after the introduction of an open office environment.

 

The measurement tools included sociometric badges (equipped with microphones, infrared sensors, accelerometers, and bluetooth sensors). Digital communications were collected from company servers. All participants were volunteers (52 in one case and 100 in the other). HR data indicated no bias.


Page 8 of 46« First...678910...203040...Last »