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Tag: stress


Health impacts depend on what kind of workaholic you are 
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Health impacts depend on what kind of workaholic you are 

It’s about how you approach work, not how long you spend there.

Source: hbr.org

Work-a-holics possess over work and even if they don't work long hours, they are still more likely to develop cardiovascular disease or diabetes than non-work-a-holics. By contrast, the research cited in this HBR article suggests that while those who work long hours not because they are possessed, but because they love what they do, are generally not at greater risk for serious health problems. The difference appears to be the ability to let it go and refresh. It the chronic rumination that is most toxic.


Excellent roundup on the impact of noise on human performance
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Excellent roundup on the impact of noise on human performance

We have never been subject to more workplace noise and distraction than we are now, but the challenges are more complex than they first appear

Source: workplaceinsight.net

Workplace Insight just produced an excellent round-up of research on the impact of noise on human performance. If you follow the topic, there won't be any big surprises, but it's great to have the data all in one place. Here's some of the research cited in the report:

- The noise problem is getting worse

- 60% of work is individual, not collaborative

- A third of employees say the have to leave the building to focus

- 63% of employees say they don't have access to quiet space

- 40% of executives understand the negative impact of noise on productivity, but only 6% mitigate it

- 75% of the noise problem is subjective

- Only 25% of the noise problem relates to its volume

- Even low levels of noice can reduce cognitive performance by 30%

- Some noise is good for creativity

 


MIT’s Working on Self-Adjusting Workspaces 
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MIT’s Working on Self-Adjusting Workspaces 

Smart office uses biosensors and machine learning to optimize individual work environments

Source: www.media.mit.edu

Imagine a workspace that adjusts the lighting, sound, and projected images for the kind of work you're doing. MIT, Steelcase, and Phillips are working together to do just that. Using sensors to measure heart rate variability, facial features, and eye focus, this trio is hoping to do. The hope for "mediated atmospheres," as they call them, is to improve human performance, reduce stress, and enhance wellness and well-being. The science behind all this is available here: https://goo.gl/XxnWG9


The high cost of poor health: The latest from Willis Towers Watson
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The high cost of poor health: The latest from Willis Towers Watson

"The Willis Towers Watson Global Benefits Attitudes Survey (GBAS) survey takes an in-depth look at the role of benefits in defining and differentiating today’s employee value proposition.

Source: www.willistowerswatson.com

The high cost of poor health is just one of the many startling findings in Willis Towers Watson's biennial survey of over 31,000 global employees. In particular, when compared to employees in good health, those in poor health:

  • Take twice the number sick days
  • Are twice as likely to be disengaged
  • Three times more likely to report above-average or high stress

Employees with financial worries fare even worse than those with poor physical health. That's critical because financial well-being has taken a nose-dive in most developed countries.

  • In the U.S, short-term financial security dropped 13 percentage points between 2015 and 2017 (from 48% to 38% reporting they feel secure).
  • More than half of global employees live from paycheck to paycheck and report they'd be unable to come up with $2k if they suddenly needed it. 

In spite of all the attention employers are paying to health and well-being programs, less than a third of U.S., Canada, and EMEA employees feel the initiatives have helped them live healthier lives. 

The report suggests employers focus on:

  • Financial counseling, tools, and training
  • Flexibility and choice among well-being programs
  • Increasing employee engagement with programs

 


An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  
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An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  

"Kate Lister breaks down the impact of the workplace on well-being and the steps to take to create a culture of well-being."

Source: workdesign.com

This article offers:

  • The financial impact of of poor health and well-being on productivity lost, reduced engagement, and turnover 
  • The cost of healthcare, absenteeism, and presenteeism for the top chronic diseases
  • A persuasive way to use a simple breakeven analysis to get your program funded
  • Simple steps to kick-start a workplace well-being initiative.


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