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Tag: TELECOMMUTE


Harvard study reveals surprising impacts when employees are allowed to work not just from home, but anywhere

A study found that “work from anywhere” policies increased productivity.

Source: hbr.org

A team from Harvard used 8 years of data from the US Patent & Trademark Office to examine the difference in outcomes between  work-from-home (WFH) vs. work-from-anywhere (WFA) programs. Here are the highlights of the 50+ page study

- They confirmed earlier research showing productivity was higher for all remote workers

- The productivity increase was greatest among WFA workers (4.4% percentage points higher than WFH), and lowest among WFH who lived >50 miles from the office (with the productivity increase among those who lived <50 miles from the office falling in between)

- They showed that in one department (Art department) teams created informal remote relationships when they were located near colleagues and this increased their productivity 

- Older WFA workers were more likely to move out of the region (Alexandria) than younger WFA workers, but both groups experienced a reduction in the cost-of-living  

- For remote workers whose job required significant interaction with colleagues, having a mandated set of IT tools increased productivity even further (3%) 

- There was no decline in quality among either group of remote workers

PTO's remote worker avoided 84 million miles of travel thus reducing emissions by 44k tons

PTO saved $38M in RE

The study valued the productivity from PTO's remote work program at $1.3 billion. It reduced commuter travel by 84M miles and emissions by 44k tons. And it saved the agency $38M in real estate costs.


HBR article finds benefits of “working from anywhere” even greater than “working from home”

HBR article finds benefits of “working from anywhere” even greater than “working from home”

Harvard study examines work from anywhere vs. work from home vs. working from an office and uncovers new findings.

Source: hbr.org

A team from Harvard used 8 years of data from the US Patent & Trademark Office to examine the difference in outcomes between  work-from-home (WFH) vs. work-from-anywhere (WFA) programs. Here's what they found: 

-WFA employees who lived within a reasonable distance from colleagues, may form remote connections which, in one department (the Art department) led to increased productivity

-They confirmed earlier research showing productivity was higher for all remote workers

-The productivity increase was greatest among WFA workers (4.4% percentage points higher than WFH), and lowest among WFH who lived >50 miles from the office (with the productivity increase among those who lived <50 miles from the office falling in between)

-Older WFA workers were more likely to move out of the region (Alexandria) than younger WFA workers, but both groups experienced a reduction in their cost-of-living 

 

-For remote workers whose job required significant interaction with colleagues, having a mandated set of IT tools increased productivity even further (3%) 

-There was no decline in quality among either group of remote workers

 

The study estimated the outcomes of PTO's remote worker program to include $1.3B in increased productivity, $38M in real estate savings, reduced travel totaling 84 million miles, and reducing emissions by 44k tons.

 


Gallup finds huge shift in employee engagement among remote employees. Highest now among those who do so 60-80% of the time, up from 20% of the time just last year. 

Gallup finds huge shift in employee engagement among remote employees. Highest now among those who do so 60-80% of the time, up from 20% of the time just last year. 

All employees who spend at least some (but not all) of their time working remotely have higher engagement than those who

don’t ever work remotely. And the tipping point for optimal engagement has

increased dramatically — from less than 20% of time to 60% to 80% of time

working remotely.

Source: www.gallup.com

The report also found those who work remotely 2-3 days a week feel substantially more productive than those who are office-bound or are who work remotely less frequently. 


Extra work for telecommuters?

Extra work for telecommuters?

Back in 2008 the Department of Veterans Affairs pissed off Representative Frank Wolf (R-Va.) when they assigned attorneys who telework an extra 140 hours of work a year compared to their office-bound colleagues. They’ve done it again in 2012, and violated the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010 in the process, by limiting the number of  attorney’s who are allowed to work to 140. This effectively puts...

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Telework grows during recession

Telework grows during recession

The naysayers said telecommuterers would scuttle back to the office during these tough economic times, but US Census data shows that’s didn’t happen. We compared the 2005 data to just-released 2010 work-at-home numbers and the percent of employees that “worked primarily at home” increased in every category (for-profit, non-profit, state, fed, local). No surprise, the self-employed numbers went down. When things get tough the economic...

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California Can Save Big With Telework

California Can Save Big With Telework

  Cash strapped California can save big with telework, but it will take courage for state and local government leadership to make it happen. The world of work has changed. To paraphrase Einstein, we can’t solve the state’s problems with the same thinking we used to create them. The numbers are huge, and we’ll be talking about the savings that are possible at the Secure Computing...

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Telework Bill Proposed

Telework Bill Proposed

If you’ve been following along here you know that our Telework Savings Calculator shows home-based work offers staggering environmental benefits. Sadly, only 3% of the U.S. workforce currently telecommutes (not including the self-employed), but 40% hold jobs that could be done from home. If those employees who could telework did so just half of the time (roughly the national average for those who already do):...

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Telecommute on Earth Day

Telecommute on Earth Day

Our research, just released, shows that if U.S. employees with telework-compatible jobs worked at home on Earth Day – this coming Wednesday, April 22 – the environment would be spared 1.5 billion pounds of greenhouse gases – the equivalent of taking 127,000 cars off the road for a year. Nationwide, less than six million Americans consider home their regular workplace, but more than 50 million...

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New Telework Calculator Shows U.S. Could Save Billions

New Telework Calculator Shows U.S. Could Save Billions

We’ve implemented a new Telework Savings Calculator here which shows that U.S. companies could add over $260 billion a year to their bottom line, and consumers could collectively save $228 billion – that’s between $2,500 to $11,000 a year each. Uncle Sam could save another $14 billion. How? By sending people home. Using the recently-released U.S. Census American Community Survey figures, and data from over...

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Work From Home “It’s the Law”

Work From Home “It’s the Law”

Minnesota Law Requires State Workers to Telecommute Boy, the folks in from the State that invented the stapler really get it when it comes to encouraging their state agencies to let their employees work from home. And they put their money where their mouth is. Under Minnesota Statute 1994 S. 15.95 sub 10, no state agency may propose or implement a capital investment plan for...

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