MENU

Tag: well-being


Leigh Stringer’s summarizes takeaways from First Annual Design Well Conference in San Diego

Leigh Stringer’s summarizes takeaways from First Annual Design Well Conference in San Diego

In case you missed it, here is a recap of the recent Design Well pre-conference and conference in San Diego, California that took place January 21-23, 2019.

Source: workdesign.com

Here's a recap of some of the topics and recommended resources  at this Friends of WE event:

  - Check out ASID's WELL Platinum+LEED Platinum space (with metrics)

  - Mindful materials offers a one-stop-shop for data on the health and environmental impact of products from leading manufacturers

  - Kay Sargent stressed the need for attention to neuro-diversity in workplace design

There are many more in the full recap.


A wellness program with bragging rights—It can work, but it has to run deep

A wellness program with bragging rights—It can work, but it has to run deep

This Palm Beach hotel has some of the happiest employees and guests in America. That's because they've made wellness a business imperative.

Source: slate.com

Wellness programs get mixed reviews, but Breakers Palm Beach, an upscale Florida resort, shows they can work. The bragging rights they've earned with their programs includes:

 

  • A 4:1 return on investment based on healthcare savings
  • Turnover that's 55% lower than peers
  • A 30:1 ratio of applications received to jobs posted
  • 92% of employees calling it a great place to work

 

The difference, according to Leigh Stringer the author of this Slate article, lies in management's deep commitment to the belief that happy employees make for happy customers.

 

Support for its broad-based health and wellness programs comes from the very top of the organization, the family who owns the resort and its top executives. It takes more than just offering gym privileges, flexible hours, and remote work options, reports Stringer. It takes a culture that gives employees permission to take advantage of the offerings.  


GSA’s free “Buildings and Health” tool offers a wealth of research

GSA’s free “Buildings and Health” tool offers a wealth of research

GSA's Sustainable Facilities Tool was designed to help federal agencies and the general public build and buy green.

Source: sftool.gov

GSA's SFTool (Sustainability Facilities) just got better with the addition of four new tools:

  • The Buildings and Health Module highlights the financial benefits and shares best practices in making buildings healthier for their occupants 
  • A synopsis of how biophilia impacts health outcomes
  • A primer on Circadian Light
  • An interactive Health and Wellness Guidance Crosswalk which provides an easy-to-use way to compare sustainability and wellness rating systems across a broad range of criteria

The site also offer a wealth of research citations and additional resources all for free (well, sort of, if you don't count your tax dollars.)


Rigorous study measures dramatic improvement in employee performance factors following 2.5 day well-being course 

Rigorous study measures dramatic improvement in employee performance factors following 2.5 day well-being course 

"Programs focused on employee well-being have gained momentum in recent years, but few have been rigorously evaluated. This study evaluates the effectiveness of an intervention designed to enhance vitality and purpose in life by assessing changes in employee quality of life (QoL) and health-related behaviors."

Source: journals.sagepub.com

Johnson & Johnson's Human Performance Institute teamed up with Tufts University to study the impact of an intensive 2.5 day well-being intervention that focused on energy management. Six months later, they measured marked improvements in participants' vitality, general health, mental health, social functioning, sense of purpose, and sleep quality.

 

It's a heavy read with 10 authors, 48 footnotes, and a heap of statistics, but it's an important one. It shows, among other things, that we need to measure what matters. Though wellness interventions have scored poorly in reducing medical expenses, their ability to improve employee performance could be far more impactful.


The high cost of poor health: The latest from Willis Towers Watson

The high cost of poor health: The latest from Willis Towers Watson

"The Willis Towers Watson Global Benefits Attitudes Survey (GBAS) survey takes an in-depth look at the role of benefits in defining and differentiating today’s employee value proposition.

Source: www.willistowerswatson.com

The high cost of poor health is just one of the many startling findings in Willis Towers Watson's biennial survey of over 31,000 global employees. In particular, when compared to employees in good health, those in poor health:

  • Take twice the number sick days
  • Are twice as likely to be disengaged
  • Three times more likely to report above-average or high stress

Employees with financial worries fare even worse than those with poor physical health. That's critical because financial well-being has taken a nose-dive in most developed countries.

  • In the U.S, short-term financial security dropped 13 percentage points between 2015 and 2017 (from 48% to 38% reporting they feel secure).
  • More than half of global employees live from paycheck to paycheck and report they'd be unable to come up with $2k if they suddenly needed it. 

In spite of all the attention employers are paying to health and well-being programs, less than a third of U.S., Canada, and EMEA employees feel the initiatives have helped them live healthier lives. 

The report suggests employers focus on:

  • Financial counseling, tools, and training
  • Flexibility and choice among well-being programs
  • Increasing employee engagement with programs

 


An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  

An answer to the question “What’s the ROI of Employee Well-Being?”  

"Kate Lister breaks down the impact of the workplace on well-being and the steps to take to create a culture of well-being."

Source: workdesign.com

This article offers:

  • The financial impact of of poor health and well-being on productivity lost, reduced engagement, and turnover 
  • The cost of healthcare, absenteeism, and presenteeism for the top chronic diseases
  • A persuasive way to use a simple breakeven analysis to get your program funded
  • Simple steps to kick-start a workplace well-being initiative.


Being “authentic” at work increases job satisfaction, well-being and more

Being “authentic” at work increases job satisfaction, well-being and more

One study found that the greater employees’ feelings of authenticity are, the greater their job satisfaction, engagement, and self-reported performance. We suggest, then, that the crucial point is finding a balance so that we can be true to ourselves while flourishing and finding success within the company.

 

Source: hbr.org

The bottom line is employers should strive for a workplace culture that encourages employees to be their true selves.


The bottom line impact of how and where we work on wellness and well-being

The bottom line impact of how and where we work on wellness and well-being

Workplace Unplugged: A candid interview with Kate Lister, of Global Workplace Analytics, where she talks workplace wellness in facilities management.

Source: www.officespacesoftware.com

Employee well-being is THE key to economic sustainability. We need to stop focusing on the cost of employee space, the cost of healthcare, and a myriad of other things that are just the tip of the iceberg. If your people are not emotionally, physically, financially and socially WELL, they simply can not do their best work.